Poetry: Five Haiku, Recalling Our Time Together

Shaded wood and mist
In green Appalachian hills;
Abandoned cabin.

I recall our time
Spent together in the woods;
Burning memories.

The cabin was bright
The hills on fire with Fall
And you kept me warm.

But now the light fades
And this dead cabin remains
To rot in tree shade.

Turning from the woods,
I leave your shadow behind
To rot in tree shade.

Poetry: “Elfland”

Unseen pathways in green hillsides,
Lead all lovers to twilight’s eyes.

Land eternal,
Never changing,
Sky frozen,
Stars of morning.

The kings of trees cry on the plains,
Morning dew from unseen rains.

A tower built without man’s hands,
Ancient beauty, old as the land.

Obsidion,
Torches’ fire,
Alabaster,
Blue sapphire.

A king of magic still at peace,
Watching man as man still sleeps.

Sound of lyre,
Song to the sire.

Never acting,
Always watching.

A world where time will never tread,
Is it life if all is dead?


This poem was inspired by a dream I had after reading The King of Elfland’s Daughter.

You may also like some of my other work:

Writing with Inspiration

How to Tell if Your Writing is Improving

Poetry: “Rusted Theme Park from My Childhood”

Make sure to follow me on Twitter and Instagram!

Should I Write a Short Story or a Novel?

This question has vexed me since I’ve started writing. The first novel-length work I ever wrote was effectively a lengthened short story by throwing contrived plot twists into the story.

It was terrible.

However, the question is a valid one: What should the length of my story be?

To be honest, there’s more options than just short story or novel. You could write a novella (and I am currently working on one) or any other length of work. So I brainstormed and came up with a few pointers for people, like me, who struggle to decide which way to go with their fiction:

  • The length of the work should depend on the work itself and your own style.

I spent some time working on a short story. I really liked where it was going. A deep lore, interesting fantasy elements, and even a geography. I think you can see the problem already. This work was not meant to be a short story. It was meant to be a longer format.

If your story involves a deeply entrenched history and other worldbuilding elements, you may want to go with a longer format. Short stories are designed to tell a tale quickly and effectively. It’s hard to get as detailed as you’d like with a short story, but not impossible.

  • A longer format allows for mistakes.

Novels can be messy. By that I mean they should be well-written, plotted, and designed to have a story with characters. But, you can make “mistakes” that you can’t make with short stories.

Due to the word constraints in a short story, there’s less space to experiment with different scenes, or beats, in a story. You have to setup and pay off within the same 3000 words, for example. In a novel, you can set things up that suggest something, then have a reversal of those expectations later in the story. However, it may be 30,000 words between setup and pay off. You have the room to experiment with it.

If your style is more attuned to adding new plot threads, suggestions of further depth, or hidden secrets, then a longer length may be preferable.

If the story contains those elements in your outlining, then you may want to think about going for the longer length, as well.

  • Short fiction has the benefit of brevity.

If “brevity is the soul of wit”, then I’d argue that a short story helps writers become witty with their choices.

Short fiction helps a writer develop plotting and endings far better than any novel. However, once a writer has developed as a short story writer, most will make the move to novels. The character development, dialogue, and worldbuilding that you can do in a novel is just plain fun. Conventional wisdom has always held that a writer should work on short stories first, then work on novels. I’m not sure I’d go as far as saying that’s required in all cases, but I see the benefits.

All in all, think about it. You and your story may benefit from a different format.


You might like some of my book reviews:

Book Review: The King of Elfland’s Daughter by Lord Dunsany

Book Review: Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

Book Review: The Shadow of the Torturer by Gene Wolfe

You may also like my other work on writing:

Finding Your Writing Style

Dodging Derivatives

Make sure to follow me on Twitter and Instagram!

Harlan Ellison on Not Being a Science Fiction Writer

I love listening to the old authors of speculative fiction. In this way I came upon a 1976 interview of Harlan Ellison describing why he is not a science fiction writer. He thinks his work doesn’t actually fit that label, and I think he’s probably right.

Sure, many of his fiction works fall into science, but others have fantasy elements or are simply real world fiction. It isn’t so simple as saying “this guy was a sci-fi writer.”

There’s much to learn from Ellison’s philosophy of writing, and I think his idea of genre is especially useful. However, if you’re a new author looking to get published, having a clearly defined genre may be more useful. It’s debatable.

Here’s the interview, at the appropriate part. I’d recommend the entire interview if you have the time!


You may like some of my other posts about writing:

Going from Outline to Manuscript

Revising Your First Draft Novel

Also check out my book reviews:

Book Review: Space Cadet by Robert Heinlein

Book Review: Slan by A. E. van Vogt

Book Review: The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

Also make sure to follow me on Twitter and Instagram!

2018 Year End Review

An interesting image I found online.
I just thought I’d share it with you.

I think 2018 was a good year for me. Granted, while I may not have been as active as I would have liked, I feel the posts I made were of a higher quality than the ones I started out with.

Before I list out some of my favorite posts from 2018, I want to thank you for participating in this site of mine.

I’ve got even more going on in 2019. From contest submissions, to novel writing and poetry, it’s going to be a goodyear!

Here’s some of my favorite reviews from 2018:

  • My review of The King of Elfland’s Daughter. This was published back in September, and was part of an ongoing series of reviews I did covering the early days of 20th century speculative fiction.
  • In the same vein, my review of A Princess of Mars was also one of my favorite posts. It was my first time really reading the book, and I was taken by it.
  • Back in July I did a review of The Broken Sword, a Poul Anderson classic I read for the first time. It was fantastic, and the review is worth your time.
  • In June was a review of N. K. Jemisin’s The Fifth Season, which I truly enjoyed. The review is much further in depth than some of the others, and based on only the effort alone, I think is worth your time.
  • Starting off the year strong was another review I did for a book I wanted to read for years. The Dragon Masters was a great read, and a book I recommend anyone into either science fiction or fantasy to enjoy.

Now, some of my more general posts were somewhat enjoyable as well. Let me go through a few of my favorite:

  • In April I posted a poem called “Cardinals in Spring Snow“. It was by far my favorite poem of the year.
  • In June I tried to sort out my thoughts on the big question, “What is Science Fiction?” I think it’s in interesting post, but after all these months, I’m not sure I agree with it. It’s still a good read, though.
  • In April was a writing post I made called Writing Descriptions. It stemmed from a conversation I had with an author friend of mine, and is still interesting to me.
  • In March was a more personal post I wrote about my struggles as a writer. It was called 75% Writing, 25% Coping, and was mostly about my thoughts on being a writer and dealing with rejection. You become able to handle rejection the more you’re exposed to it.

I hope this has been interesting, and I appreciate your time.

Thank you!


If you liked this, you may want to follow me on Twitter or Facebook!
You can also find me on Instagram, though it’s mostly pictures of books.

Book Review: The King of Elfland’s Daughter by Lord Dunsany

51Fp8XBGpBLTo continue my read through of older (and sometimes overlooked) works in the history of fantasy and science fiction literature, I have arrived in 1924 for Lord Dunsany’s The King of Elfland’s Daughter.

Previously I’ve read A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs (1912) and The Ship of Ishtar by A. Merritt (1924). I would recommend both for those interested in older literature of the spectacular. Also The Broken Sword by Poul Anderson was published in 1954, and fits as an influential book in its own right, if you’re interested in that.

The book was fantastic. I wouldn’t say it’s perfect, though, no book is. There was a bit of a lag in the middle to end of the book, roughly the 50% to 75% mark. In addition, the story seems to have no real action by the main characters after the halfway point, but that’s by design. As far as how readable it is, I leave that up to the individual reader. I had no problem approaching the book, but will readily admit some difficulty after the middle section.

The story of the book was concerned with two kingdoms: the kingdom of men named Erl and the kingdom of fairies named Elfland. The king of Erl, in the beginning is asked by his people to give them a king who has magic. The king, knowing that what they were asking would lead to trouble, told his only son to venture to Elfland and wed the legendary princess there. That way, there would be magic in the royal bloodline.

The first quarter of the story was concerned with the prince of Erl finding his bride, returning with her, and living with her in Erl. Then, she decides to return to Elfland, and the rest of the book is concerned with the time difference between the two realms and how time doesn’t move for her and the fairies while the men search for a way to get to her.

The characters were the second weakest part of the book, the first being the plot. The titular character, Lirazel, was fascinating as a concept. But as a character she’s shallow. Lirazel was torn between loving Alveric and Erl, and longing to return to Elfland and her father.

Alveric himself was an unsympathetic character who went from heroic in the first quarter to utterly useless in the latter parts of the book.

Their child, Orion, was the most interesting character, in my opinion. He loved his hounds, wanted to meet his mother, but doesn’t want to leave the world he knows behind. It’s complicated and interesting. Ultimately, it culminates in a hunt he took to kill a unicorn. This proved to the people of Erl he was skilled, but also that he had some magic in him after all. Honestly, I had no interest in the unicorn hunt, but it was beautifully told.

The best part of the book was Dunsany’s writing. His descriptions of Elfland as bordering on the twilight of the sky was something magical taken directly from fairytales. The King of Elfland, himself, was never really seen as much as felt. He’s a presence in the story, whose power and authority echo throughout the tale. It’s fascinating and interesting and beautiful. The runes he used in the story had earth-shattering effects, able to change the border of his land to recede, to block people from entering.

It’s an amazing story. I would recommend it for anyone who loves older fiction and fantasy books.

Lord Dunsany writes like a man who has the muses on his shoulder, feeding him the language of imagination and wonder themselves.


You might like some of my other work:

What is Science Fiction?

Book Review: Jack of Shadows by Roger Zelazny

Writing with Inspiration

Poetry: “Cardinals in Spring Snow”

Northern_cardinals_on_snow

Two cardinals hover,
In warm morning light,
Twirling to old lands,
Crimson wings alight.
~
Rolled clouds move swiftly,
Ready to burst forth,
White manna poured out,
Paint on rusted earth.
~
Bird chirps cease,
Hidden crickets quell.
~
The warm red feathers,
Loosing foggy breath,
Warmth sought inside holes,
Life hiding from death.
~
By next cold sunset,
A cardinal flew away,
Shivering alone,
The snow’s price was paid.

 


It snowed here recently. As a result, I saw wildlife get covered in it. The image of Spring life covered with snow was an incongruity I couldn’t ignore.

– Frank Ormond

Writing Descriptions

architecture-3095521_960_720

I was talking to an author friend of mine about his book. Honestly, it was a great read and I was impressed by one element in particular: his descriptions.

He was great at it! Not too many, but not too few. It felt like he let the reader’s imagination control the imagery, but gave enough to ground the story to a specific image. It worked well.

That being said, I noticed my own failings quickly. I’m awful at over-description!

The Curse of Over-description

The symptoms are straining for any author trying to craft amazing fiction. You get bogged down describing in detail every facet of a world you’re trying to build. It’s especially easy for speculative fiction or memoirs, because you really want to paint a picture in those genres.

There’s a good way to fix it, though. You simply have to figure out what a reader needs. It helps to have friends to read your work in the early stages, or alpha readers when you get to the point of allowing strangers to take a look at your manuscript.

My friend ended up explaining that he didn’t actually have the same issue I did, but that he did have his own issue. You see, there’s an equally dangerous possibility with writing: under-description.

images

A Barebones Manuscript

The Curse of Under-description

The symptoms are easy to fall into once you start to “trim the fat” in your writing. There’s too many ways to end up with a barebones manuscript.

You need to make sure to figure out what’s important to properly convey. Is it really important that the reader knows that the spaceship you’re discussing had five PD-40 Ion Engines with small carvings of elephant tusks and inscriptions in runes around the edges? Or is it better to say there’s five ornate ion engines?

Well, it depends. You can do “info dumps” as Ben Bova called them, but don’t do them constantly. You need a gentle touch!

Once again, those early readers are important. Get a friend to read through it, someone who’s going to be honest with you.

Hopefully this helps you! It comes from a personal place to me.


 

Maybe you’ll like some of my other posts on writing:

Where the First Draft Ends and Second Draft Begins

Going from Outline to Manuscript

Writing with Inspiration

Or maybe a couple of my reviews:

Book Review: The Shadow of the Torturer by Gene Wolfe

Book Review: Jack of Shadows by Roger Zelazny

Book Review: Trading in Danger by Elizabeth Moon

75% Writing, 25% Coping

chalkboard-1927332_960_720Rejection isn’t something a writer should fear. We all get hit by it, one rejection at a time. I’ve lost count of the amount of rejections I’ve had since I got serious about writing. It’s what happens.

I think to myself: am I really improving? What am I doing wrong?

It’s worrying to think I’m missing something, I’m failing to meet someone’s approval.

In truth, I feel like I’ve improved. I look back at my early work and scoff. There’s no way  anyone could reasonably look over my work and think it was written by a skilled storyteller.

But it also feels like I’m at the edge. Like all I need is a little more improvement and I’ll be there. I have the ideas, the realization of what it is I like about these stories, but all I need is a little something more. I need a spark, a small light to kindle the flame of my writing. There’s something missing, but I don’t know what.

But it’s more than that. I sometimes really worried my dream of being published won’t come true.

Even now more lessons strike my heart. I think to myself about how I write and realize I need to write as I think. An easy thing to say, but a personal realization to me nonetheless.

But I have to cope. The writing game is 75% writing, 25% coping.