Personal Update – May 15th, 2019

Hello! Thanks for reading this. I just wanted to let you know that I still read and write, but my circumstances have shifted slightly. To be honest, I have a new job opportunity at work, and I’m going to be working on it over the next few months. Because of that, I’ve been a little preoccupied at work and unable to focus enough to write a book review, or even finish a book I felt like reviewing.

Oh I’ve read plenty, but I don’t feel like they’re worth writing reviews of (lots of graphic novels and light novels, as well).

Speaking of graphic novels, I thought about reviewing the Sandman series, since I’m a pretty big Neil Gaiman fan. Let me know if you’d be interested in that!

I’ve also got a poem or two I’ve been working on. One’s been rounding through the submission cycles, and if it doesn’t land at the tenth one, I’ll probably just post it here!

Anyways, I appreciate you reading this. I’ll update with something writing related tomorrow. Thanks for reading, again!

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2018 Year End Review

An interesting image I found online.
I just thought I’d share it with you.

I think 2018 was a good year for me. Granted, while I may not have been as active as I would have liked, I feel the posts I made were of a higher quality than the ones I started out with.

Before I list out some of my favorite posts from 2018, I want to thank you for participating in this site of mine.

I’ve got even more going on in 2019. From contest submissions, to novel writing and poetry, it’s going to be a goodyear!

Here’s some of my favorite reviews from 2018:

  • My review of The King of Elfland’s Daughter. This was published back in September, and was part of an ongoing series of reviews I did covering the early days of 20th century speculative fiction.
  • In the same vein, my review of A Princess of Mars was also one of my favorite posts. It was my first time really reading the book, and I was taken by it.
  • Back in July I did a review of The Broken Sword, a Poul Anderson classic I read for the first time. It was fantastic, and the review is worth your time.
  • In June was a review of N. K. Jemisin’s The Fifth Season, which I truly enjoyed. The review is much further in depth than some of the others, and based on only the effort alone, I think is worth your time.
  • Starting off the year strong was another review I did for a book I wanted to read for years. The Dragon Masters was a great read, and a book I recommend anyone into either science fiction or fantasy to enjoy.

Now, some of my more general posts were somewhat enjoyable as well. Let me go through a few of my favorite:

  • In April I posted a poem called “Cardinals in Spring Snow“. It was by far my favorite poem of the year.
  • In June I tried to sort out my thoughts on the big question, “What is Science Fiction?” I think it’s in interesting post, but after all these months, I’m not sure I agree with it. It’s still a good read, though.
  • In April was a writing post I made called Writing Descriptions. It stemmed from a conversation I had with an author friend of mine, and is still interesting to me.
  • In March was a more personal post I wrote about my struggles as a writer. It was called 75% Writing, 25% Coping, and was mostly about my thoughts on being a writer and dealing with rejection. You become able to handle rejection the more you’re exposed to it.

I hope this has been interesting, and I appreciate your time.

Thank you!


If you liked this, you may want to follow me on Twitter or Facebook!
You can also find me on Instagram, though it’s mostly pictures of books.

Writing Descriptions

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I was talking to an author friend of mine about his book. Honestly, it was a great read and I was impressed by one element in particular: his descriptions.

He was great at it! Not too many, but not too few. It felt like he let the reader’s imagination control the imagery, but gave enough to ground the story to a specific image. It worked well.

That being said, I noticed my own failings quickly. I’m awful at over-description!

The Curse of Over-description

The symptoms are straining for any author trying to craft amazing fiction. You get bogged down describing in detail every facet of a world you’re trying to build. It’s especially easy for speculative fiction or memoirs, because you really want to paint a picture in those genres.

There’s a good way to fix it, though. You simply have to figure out what a reader needs. It helps to have friends to read your work in the early stages, or alpha readers when you get to the point of allowing strangers to take a look at your manuscript.

My friend ended up explaining that he didn’t actually have the same issue I did, but that he did have his own issue. You see, there’s an equally dangerous possibility with writing: under-description.

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A Barebones Manuscript

The Curse of Under-description

The symptoms are easy to fall into once you start to “trim the fat” in your writing. There’s too many ways to end up with a barebones manuscript.

You need to make sure to figure out what’s important to properly convey. Is it really important that the reader knows that the spaceship you’re discussing had five PD-40 Ion Engines with small carvings of elephant tusks and inscriptions in runes around the edges? Or is it better to say there’s five ornate ion engines?

Well, it depends. You can do “info dumps” as Ben Bova called them, but don’t do them constantly. You need a gentle touch!

Once again, those early readers are important. Get a friend to read through it, someone who’s going to be honest with you.

Hopefully this helps you! It comes from a personal place to me.


 

Maybe you’ll like some of my other posts on writing:

Where the First Draft Ends and Second Draft Begins

Going from Outline to Manuscript

Writing with Inspiration

Or maybe a couple of my reviews:

Book Review: The Shadow of the Torturer by Gene Wolfe

Book Review: Jack of Shadows by Roger Zelazny

Book Review: Trading in Danger by Elizabeth Moon

75% Writing, 25% Coping

chalkboard-1927332_960_720Rejection isn’t something a writer should fear. We all get hit by it, one rejection at a time. I’ve lost count of the amount of rejections I’ve had since I got serious about writing. It’s what happens.

I think to myself: am I really improving? What am I doing wrong?

It’s worrying to think I’m missing something, I’m failing to meet someone’s approval.

In truth, I feel like I’ve improved. I look back at my early work and scoff. There’s no way  anyone could reasonably look over my work and think it was written by a skilled storyteller.

But it also feels like I’m at the edge. Like all I need is a little more improvement and I’ll be there. I have the ideas, the realization of what it is I like about these stories, but all I need is a little something more. I need a spark, a small light to kindle the flame of my writing. There’s something missing, but I don’t know what.

But it’s more than that. I sometimes really worried my dream of being published won’t come true.

Even now more lessons strike my heart. I think to myself about how I write and realize I need to write as I think. An easy thing to say, but a personal realization to me nonetheless.

But I have to cope. The writing game is 75% writing, 25% coping.

Writing with Inspiration

creativity_idea_inspiration_innovation_pencil_paper_plan_business-714869I often struggle to find a push to write when I’m feeling ill or tired. Since I have a full time job and a family, I’m often tired and just want to relax. However, I think once motivation is conquered, the next hurdle is inspiration.

Where do you find inspiration?

Inspiration can come from anything. Other stories, people you’ve met, ideas you have in the shower, friends and family, and just generally living your life. That last part is important. How can you write about people and events if you don’t live your life?

Being an introvert, I get it. I get tired talking to people and meeting large groups, but I do it to interact and learn about human interaction. Your character dialogue might improve if you learn how other people talk. Who knows, you might even get inspired by a stranger to create a brand new character!

If you find yourself being boxed in, without an idea to move forward with, try stepping out and seeing the world and the people in it. Maybe that will help you as it has me.

Ultimately, inspiration is a result of what you put into it. Go out and experience things, and write about similar things.


You might like some of my reviews:

Book Review: The Shadow of the Torturer by Gene Wolfe

Book Review: The Dragon Masters by Jack Vance

Book Review: The “Troy Rising” Trilogy by John Ringo

You might also like some more of my writing posts:

Turning a Hobby into a Career

Where the First Draft Ends and Second Draft Begins

Life Update – 2017/10/28

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I have a lot to say today. First off, thank you so much for all the followers! I am approaching a hundred on WordPress alone, which is amazing. What’s more is I am above a hundred on my Twitter account, which is also such a great thing to see, so thank you for that as well!

I suppose I should update you, my dear reader, on my life events:

Dragon Con

My first convention didn’t happen this year. I’ve never been to one, but was hoping to go to Dragon Con in Atlanta. It’s not too far from me, so it would be a good one to visit. There’s a great scifi/fantasy scene, and I was hoping to get to know some people there.

However, it looks like I’m clear to go to it in 2018. I hope to see you there!

 

My First (Real) Novel

As for my first non-NaNoWriMo novel, I hope I’ll be done by the end of the year. I had three short stories over the last two months that distracted me, but I think that should be fixed soon.

I’ve only even written one novel before this one, and it had far less in the way of crafting an entire universe. It was also half as long as this, as NaNoWriMo requires 50k words, and this one is looking to be around 100k.

To be honest, I have sat down to write novels in the past, but never completed them. When I completed my first one in NaNoWriMo, I realized it was possible, and saw in my future the reality of a finished work. I can write a novel, and so can you.

 

Poetry Still

I still love poetry, even if I think the medium is a shadow of what it once was. The self-reflective aesthetic of the 19th century was lost to a modern interest in conceptual messaging. I much prefer poetry with both form and beauty, and I think I will begin to share with you, my dear reader, my poems.

If you’re interested in poetry, leave me a comment so I know. I’ll share some in the future if this is the case.

 

Submissions, Submissions, and More Submissions

I have two completed short stories that are nearing submission quality. One is much closer than the other, so I want to get that one out tomorrow to various publications. The second one needs a solid 5% reduction in word count.

There’s a last short story that’s not at all finished. Oh, it’s a complete story, it’s just terribly dull. I’ll need to either gut it or restructure it to be a stronger contender for an interesting story.

 

My Future

I mentioned in my last blog post about my concerns over taking my hobby of writing and turning it into a career.

The thought weighs on me like a heavy backpack. I wonder about whether trying to do such a thing is beyond me, but then I remember that I shouldn’t be lacking the business acumen (I studied the subject, after all), the marketing knowledge (I have a background in such), and the writing skills (I still polish these ad infinitum).

Perhaps I can make this a career. Perhaps not. However, if I don’t try, it won’t happen either way.


 

Thank you for reading.

That’s what’s happening in my life, dear reader. If you liked this, please read some of my other posts below, and make sure to follow me on Twitter and Instagram. My Instagram is devoted mostly to the books I buy, and my Twitter has random RTs of interest to me (generally science and the arts).

Check out some of my book reviews:

Book Review: The Voyage of the Space Beagle by A. E. van Vogt

Book Review: Space Cadet by Robert Heinlein

Book Review: Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

You may like more of my work on writing:

Where the First Draft Ends and Second Draft Begins

How to Tell if Your Writing is Improving

Going from Outline to Manuscript

Turning a Hobby into a Career

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I’ve wrestled with my decisions, wondering whether I should have a full time career for income and security. Right now, it’s a no-brainer. I need a job in order to pay the bills. But what about writing?

Is it just a hobby?

Well, it is. I love doing it. I love weaving ideas into characters and plot points, building worlds from my mind, and structuring out a story that I would find interesting. I love everything about writing, even the garbage parts like editing spelling mistakes.

But does it have to stay a hobby?

I suppose it’s a pipedream to actually make a living doing it, but I can certainly try. I love reading science fiction, so why shouldn’t I try to turn what I love into what I love doing?

Do you have any thoughts? Is it a waste of time?

Busy All Around

I apologize for the lack of updates. My life has been busy with family and friends occupying my free time. Aside from that, writing and reading take most of my extra time, with movies, games, and TV filling what’s left over.

To be honest, I have a lot in the works:

  • I have a short story that I’m polishing up. It should be ready for the submission circuit within a week.
  • I am just over the half-way mark on my main science fiction novel, which is progressing at a decent pace.
  • I have an additional short story that I’m in the early stages with. It’s written but it needs that second draft rewrite that really brings out what’s best in a story.
  • I have a new science fiction novel that I’m outlining and starting to draft for a future project, but I’m going to do minor progress on it until I’m done with my current project.

Keep in mind, this is progress despite working full time, having a family, and trying to maintain sanity while reading and entertaining myself aside from writing. It’s a balancing act. It always is.